Author Topic: Dockland  (Read 701 times)

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Offline ed styles

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #15 on: 12 May, 2019, 09:33:55 PM »
Boys this is my sort of post, Hoppy hoppy , Ghoster , half a turn , cabbage, give yer eyes a chance , cabbage ( p.l.a. police ) greenacre ( when a cargo set comes adrift ) dunnage hardwood foreign timber laid on the deck in the hold to stow cargo on, Hullage damaged when loading cargo ,mainly spirits then strangely end up undamaged with loading gangs throughout the Ship , a drink from a bottle of spirit was having a wet , muggo, ,  wouid you adam and eve it , mind gone blank , will post back later   
All the best ed

Offline ed styles

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #16 on: 12 May, 2019, 10:15:58 PM »
Shouid have posted yesterday 11th, on this day in 1972 the British ship Royston Grange was in collision with a Chinese tanker near Montevideo , and all hands were lost 74 including 12 passengers . Over the years I have mentioned this terrible collision many times so It is well mentioned if you are not familiar with it .
She was a very attractive ship belonging to Houlder Bros with a very distinctive white Maltese cross on her Funnel and her usual discharging berth was inthe Victoria Dock near the Connaught , I worked on her when she was loading in the K.G.V. about 8 weeks before the collision , truly a tragic loss .

 ED

Offline MickG

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #17 on: 13 May, 2019, 02:07:28 AM »
Hello Ed, They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This is the Roystan Grange and as you said, she looked very elegant.

Royston Grange



Offline KenM

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #18 on: 13 May, 2019, 11:06:29 AM »
Hi Ed, your dockland sayings brought back many happy years, another one which I used to like  the sound of was "job & knock" my didn't the work get sorted in a very short time.
MickG, thanks for posting those photos of the Royston Grange, that was the time when ships looked elegant, not a bit like the so called modern fleet of container boats, they look so ugly & unstable.
Ken.

Offline KenM

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #19 on: 15 May, 2019, 11:08:10 AM »
Ed, re your post of the Royston Grange collision.
Why do we have these terrible collisions at sea when equipped with high tech navigation.
Surely sat nav will alert the bridge of other ships in the immediate vicinity.
Is it equipment failure or human?
Ken.

Offline harry

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #20 on: 15 May, 2019, 02:51:26 PM »
Hi Ken do you think that Sat Nav was in use in The197o,s or did they all depend on Radar and the old Eyeball system ,this is me thinking like a land lubber.  The only time I went to sea!!was during national service when I spent 7 days aboard HMS Undine which was doing tests for various weapons systems including Radar detection and avoidance .  The firing test that sticks in my mind was the firing of Bofars guns shooting at a sock being towed behind jet airplane ,when the pilot radioed to the ship reminding them that he was towing the sock not pushing it ( I suppose this was an ongoing joke re this type of test!!!).  Regards Harry.I.

Offline KenM

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #21 on: 15 May, 2019, 06:33:24 PM »
Harry, you are probably right about sat nav in the 70s, but radar was well developed in the 70s.
The eyeball system was left to the poor old 3rd officer, who can have his ar*e kicked by all.
Even in recent years with sat nav we hear of collisions at sea, why?
Now with these huge oil/chemical tankers racing into port to gain the highest market prices, navigation aids are a must.
Ken

Offline MickG

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #22 on: 15 May, 2019, 09:04:33 PM »
I watched and interesting programme about navigation once. Although working out a ships latitude had been known for many years, finding out its longitude had long proved to be elusive. It was a Suffolk clock maker called John Harrison that eventually solved the problem with clocks. Clocks on a long sea voyage by sail were notorious for the inaccuracy as there was no way of checking them. The ball on the pole at Greenwich observatory drops at a given time of day and when Greenwich was a centre of naval dominance, it was how they set their clocks. Harrison had to build clocks that were very accurate.

Offline ed styles

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #23 on: 22 May, 2019, 04:33:34 PM »
Boys , when I tried to log on last Friday it all went blank , so been away to a good ol east end resort Walton on the Naze ,come back and all is well with the Forum. Got me thinking with the subject title Docklands , when I first went in the Docks to work this word Docklands as I remember didn't exist , so when did it start ? .My guess is late 70s early 80s .pretty much same timewhen Canary Wharf kicked of .
The yanks call it the Waterfront and wharves and the Aussies and Kiwis the same ,and Wharfies unload and load ships we have Sevedores and Dockers .
All the best Ed

Offline alffox

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #24 on: 22 May, 2019, 05:10:26 PM »
Living in Custom House it seemed only natural that the Docks would be where I found my first work age 16 in 1947 and life began with the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company in King George Vth Dock.  A break for RAF National Service then a succession of jobs with Blue Star Line, Royal Mail Line and the Port Line before joining the Port of London Authority in the West India and Millwall Docks.   In those early PLA days there was a regular staff magazine and supplement printed and handed out and in later years there became other printed material namely "THE PORT" newspaper, POLANEWS and later THE PORT OF LONDON.   Now - I am what one might call a hoarder and after each word in an issue had been thoroughly digested the edition would be placed in a plastic box which eventually found its way into my loft space.   These newspapers and magazines just kept coming even though I retired in 1980 - the PLA would post monthly issues out to retired members.      Having "squirrelled" these away for many years (probably 50 to 80) - they begin in the 1960's for PLA magazines and 1970's to late 1990's for others I am reluctant to just confine them to the "skip" so can anyone suggest a suitable resting place for my bundles of dockland history - decasulisation, union disputes, sale of Tilbury Dock, the closure of others and a whole wealth of history.   The Museum of Docklands are not willing to take any material when offered as they really do not have sufficient staff to ponder over each article and nor to save some for posterity.   Not in any consecutive order but just a bundle of newspapers that I am willing to pass on to any interested parties.   Contact me through this message board if anyone has any ideas on their disposal.  They are currently sited in Billericay.

alffox.

Offline MickG

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #25 on: 22 May, 2019, 05:34:05 PM »
Hello Alf, The Museum of London might well be interested in your collection. Try copying and pasting the following link for further information

https://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/collections/about-our-collections/what-we-collect/port-london-authority-archive

Ed the board suddenly went offline about a week ago and all one saw was a message which said database error. However it came back online today.

Offline alffox

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #26 on: 22 May, 2019, 07:37:52 PM »
Mick - thanks for your reply but Museum of London definately not interested in receiving any material - they emailed me to say that they are totally full and would not be accepting anything other than special items.

Will bin them soon
 alffox

Offline MickG

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #27 on: 23 May, 2019, 09:00:15 AM »
Alf, the only other place I can think that may be interested in your collection is the Docklands History group. The link is below. It might be worth getting in contact with them if you have not already done so.

http://www.docklandshistorygroup.org.uk/

Offline KenM

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #28 on: 23 May, 2019, 10:43:53 AM »
Hi Ed, I first heard the mention of Docklands when the developers were trying to market  their houses & flats,
(Whoops apartments) it had more appeal than redundant warehouse's
Its nice to have the forum back, I thought that it had done a runner again.
Ken.
« Last Edit: 24 May, 2019, 10:58:12 AM by KenM »

Offline harry

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Re: Dockland
« Reply #29 on: 23 May, 2019, 01:45:59 PM »
Hi All great to have site back ,had a couple of frustrating days trying to find out what had happened??. Regards Harry.I.