Author Topic: A Dead Horse  (Read 1021 times)

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Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #30 on: 05 December, 2018, 11:43:39 AM »
Hi Harry, yes I can remember the dreaded bumper being pushed around your bed space, no polish was allowed as it was deemed to be a fire hazard on the floor boards.
At Blandford my spider accomodation was sited alongside the Blandford Beagles kennels & 20 howling Beagles did not allow for a good nights sleep.
Another thing that comes to mind is the gas chamber, the choking stayed with us for hours, much to the delight of the NCOs.
Ken.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #31 on: 05 December, 2018, 02:03:46 PM »
Hi Ken I believe you might have billeted in the same type of wooden huts , they were called spiders. I think that they were built during WW2 to accommodate American servicemen injured during the Normandy landings and used as a hospital.? Regards Harry.I.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #32 on: 05 December, 2018, 03:27:39 PM »
Re the inoculations I can remember the multi jabs in both arms . To get these jabs we were marched across moorland to another Barracks ,Service Corps I seem to remember, and another surprise the chap who gave the jabs was the camp barber!!
But the jab I remember most was the one that you were given 36 hours off and I suppose it was coincidence that it was given last thing on Friday so you the weekend to get over it!!. I seem to remember this jab left you the following morning feeling like your arm had been nailed to your body with a six inch nail (ouch I felt that one) Regards Harry.I.

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #33 on: 06 December, 2018, 12:03:52 PM »
Harry you surprise me, I thought it was the camp cobbler that stuck the needle in me, it felt like a boot stud.
Ken.

Offline nollanhej

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #34 on: 06 December, 2018, 01:11:20 PM »
I had the four injections in four places. When I walked away, the so-called male nurse chased after me and said I want my needle back it is bent and still in your arm.  When we all got back to the hut we all started shaking and all finished up in our pits. As you say it was a Friday. I think it was some sort of fever injection and was called a "Schick" test. You could say, we all suffered that night with the "Schicks". 
« Last Edit: 06 December, 2018, 01:33:46 PM by nollanhej »

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #35 on: 07 December, 2018, 10:32:56 AM »
The injection that gave us most misery was the TABT & then there was the little hook that was inserted into your upper arm that left a scar for life. By the time that we were ready for the Yellow Fever & other far east jabs, we were hardened to everything that they could throw at us.
Ken.

Offline nollanhej

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #36 on: 07 December, 2018, 11:25:03 AM »
That's a good point, KenM

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #37 on: 07 December, 2018, 03:42:34 PM »
The army has a lot to answer for. They insisted that we take bloody great tablets of salt every day, which they now tell us is a bad thing, then they gave us 50 free cigarettes each week, another no no.
I wonder how many still have hacking coughs as a result.
Ken.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #38 on: 07 December, 2018, 03:52:41 PM »
Hi Ken, we only had free cigarettes if one of the boats bringing contraband from north Africa was cought by Customs and the contraband cigarettes were distributed among the services serving in Gibraltar. I can remember on at least two occasions we were issued with Fifty Dunhill cigarettes each. Regards Harry.I
 

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #39 on: 08 December, 2018, 11:03:17 AM »
Harry, the issue of Capstan Full strength had the camp coughing all night, but they did keep the mosquitoes away.
The anti malarial Paladrin tablets were another disgusting tablet that they insisted we take at lunch time, it made the powdered mash potato taste even worse.
Ken.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #40 on: 08 December, 2018, 02:57:20 PM »
Hi  Ken we had to use Pom at least once a week and I remember a ruse I used to fool the lads.  What I decided to do was boil some potatoes mash them up and mix with the potatoe  powder and voila wool had been pulled over eyes but I must say just the once!!. Also another issue we had was hard tack biscuits these were added to soups as a thickening agent .Regards Harry.I.

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #41 on: 09 December, 2018, 11:13:27 AM »
Ah yes, the hard tack biscuits, we had them twice a week & had great fun skimming them down the dining area, they were no good for anything else. Our food was ok if you consider that we only had 1 ACC sergeant & whoever was on jankers, the cooking was achieved using wood burning stoves that were kept burning all night for cooking breakfast. The seageant chef must have been a magician because he managed to put up some tasty meals on very meagre supplies.
Ken.