Author Topic: A Dead Horse  (Read 1022 times)

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Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #15 on: 24 July, 2018, 03:34:07 PM »
Hi Alf, your mention of Reg Shaw brought back some memories of our time at T&L.
Reg & I worked on the same carpenters bench for several years before Reg left to complete his National Service in the RAF.
We never got together away from work, Reg was a football & cricket man, wheras I preferred badminton, tennis & dashing around with of group of motocyclists
Reg did invite me to his wedding but I never managed to get there.
kenm.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #16 on: 25 July, 2018, 12:55:40 PM »
I suppose this will come under the same heading" Dead Horse" watching the antiques road show on Sunday I noticed two chaps dressed in dark blue wearing tall hats I believe they used  to be called " Bobbies" how apt that they were on a show of Antiques just don,t see many about these days.
 Have also noticed this week a number of Police vehicles in the car park of our council  offices,the local Police station having closed a while back this seems to be a trend?.
The Police station at Rainham in Essex is now a row of houses called Gladstone Place where do they take offenders when they have to be locked up.
Has anyone else noticed this trend and when did you las see a police man on the beat???.Regards Harry I.
« Last Edit: 26 July, 2018, 10:01:39 AM by harry »

Offline MickG

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #17 on: 25 July, 2018, 05:33:07 PM »
Harry, The trend of closing police stations is happening all over. Although this is not Newham related, we have had the same thing happen in Yeovil near to where I live. The main police station which was the only one to have cells was closed. Now if someone is arrested they have to be taken to Bridgewater 42 miles away. While police are transporting people the have arrested long distances, they are certainly not on patrol.

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #18 on: 26 July, 2018, 12:08:25 PM »
Harry, a real policeman is a rare animal in Christchurch, there was a time when traffic wardens morphed into community officers & patrolled the high st,
not crime busters, but issuing tickets to unsuspecting motorists.
The police station has been closed, not a great loss as it has been staffed by civilians with not a lot of interest in the job for some time.
Most people respected the local constable, community officers are not viewed in the same way.
kenm

Offline alffox

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #19 on: 26 July, 2018, 04:13:07 PM »
To add a short note re Gibraltar - the barracks my grandfather was billeted in was called Buena Vista Barracks and had I mentioned it to the driver of our small coach - he sais he would have taken the time to stop and show me a few more details.  I was eight years old when he died so did not have any time with him at all - he lived in Dagenham and our home was in Custom House.  Could not afford cars in those days.
As for my National Service - well with my posting to Hendon Aerodrome I enjoyed a life of somewhat luxury - the airfield had to be open from dawn to dusk and we in the Air Movement Section were expected to man the section for all of that time - no shift work in those days - some days I guess it was 16 hours on but the benfit came in that for one week you were on duty for two days only and the next week for five days so that gave plenty of time for recreation.  I lived in camp but had a "Living Out Pass" which allowed me to be at home for days at a time (still got one or two telegrams calling me back for duty).  During that service time I spent time on Canvey Island during the floods of 1953 - being billeted at Hornchurch Aerodrome and being carried by lorry to the main Pub later called the King Canute.    Back at Hendon we saw all kinds of aircraft and politicians flying in and around the country to view the damage.   The earthquake on Corfu almost took me away from Hendon as some of us lads at Hendon volunteered to go to Lyneham and assist in the loading of the aircraft taking out clothing and other goods - problem was that Lyneham wanted to keep us at their base.        On another occasion there had been a large sporting event in London involving military teams from nearby European Countries - two Dakota aircraft fully loaded with the Dutch team sat on the apron in front of the control tower awaiting for orders to take off.  Before they could go I was given the task of climbing on board both and searching for John Christie of Rillington Place - the serial murderer.   Never a dull moment - should have signed on for another three years in 1954 but life at Hendon had been too good to me and I knew I would be posted abroad somewhere.  Chose to leave.
alffox

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #20 on: 26 July, 2018, 04:58:35 PM »
Hi Alf, your mention of Canvey Island & Hornchurch brings back memories.
Many times were enjoyed at a pub call The Lobster Pot, I also recall bouncing over that rickety timber bridge on my motorbike, across the mudflats.
Hornchurch was home for a few years after leaving the army, approx 10mins walk from the station which was handy as I was working in the Royal Docks. I believe RAF Hornchurch played a large part in WW11 as a fighter base.
kenm.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #21 on: 27 July, 2018, 02:08:46 PM »
Hi Alf I have noticed that in various places around England there are military buildings that are similar to those in Gibraltar. For instance  at Shoeburyness behind the Garrison public house are some flats which are very much the same as the barracks where I did my National Service in Gibraltar . On the Isle of Portland there some of the same. Even Tilbury and Coalhouse forts are of similar construction all I can assume is that they were all designed by the same people In around 1870 I am only guessing at this date perhaps someone else could have more info on this. Regards Harry I.
« Last Edit: 10 August, 2018, 11:42:38 AM by harry »

Offline ed styles

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #22 on: 15 August, 2018, 04:14:24 PM »
Ken and Alf
 Your mention of Reg Shaw bought back memories of working with him late 60's . We were both Time served Chippies him with T&L and me in the Docks . We met up when working on the " buildings " for Wates in Woodford then Bethnal green and Lovalls in Stepney .In those days the Evening News had about 3-4 columns of buiding jobs so you had yer pick .Despite his big build I found Reg a quiet man he often let me do the slagging off as I am only 5.6" and him a good 6 + ft .I only found out on here last year he was about 9 yrs older then me I'm 74 so missed national service by a couple of years a really top bloke in the short time i knew him , I remember at one time we had to swing some really heavy doors so because of his big height I decided that he could chop the top butts in and little ol me the bottom butts that was a laugh.

 All the best ed

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #23 on: 17 August, 2018, 11:44:04 AM »
Hi Ed, working with Reg Shaw was a doddle, he was so laid back & used to get on well with all in the workshop.
A mix of young & old could be volatile at times, but Reg would sail through the storm, no trouble.
For a while Reg's dad was the chippies mate, so kept a close eye on him.
Reg had a different view on authority than I, which created some laughs at times.
kenm.

Offline nollanhej

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #24 on: 02 December, 2018, 09:48:30 PM »
A dead horse . . . I knew something was nagging me! anyhow, I went to Wanstead for a medical, and, always remember the old finger around my you know what's and told to cough. This was in 1952. After a squabble with some posh toffee-nosed . . . I forgot that I had left a boiling hot iron on the sleeve of my best BD jacket only to find an iron-shape mark that fell out into a hole the exact same size as the iron. Needless to say I went on a charge and finished up on 7/6 a week for months to pay for it. Mum's 7/- a week was still paid to her, and the other 14/- went on paying for it weeks and weeks. Needless to say it was a case of hitch-hiking home, and blagging the fare back from Paddington. ' Appy Days ????   Yer. Rye should say so! ::) ::)
« Last Edit: 03 December, 2018, 09:58:24 AM by nollanhej »

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #25 on: 03 December, 2018, 10:46:36 AM »
Hi nollanhej, its great to see you back on the forum.
Memories of the Wanstead medical seems to remain with us even after 70 years or more.
The barrack damages must have been another drain on your 7/6 a week, how did you pay for the Blanco & Brasso?
Appy Days, there were a few laughs along the way.
Ken.

Offline nollanhej

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #26 on: 03 December, 2018, 12:01:06 PM »
Actually Ken, old-age [whatever that is?] is catching up! It was only seven shilling a week [the queen's shilling a day, by law] as I say, the other 21/- went on uniform and to mum. I had some good friends in my hut who helped me out if I needed it. That rotten best BD must have cost a fortune. It was certainly more expensive that a suit from Pollocks in Raffy Market!

Offline KenM

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #27 on: 04 December, 2018, 11:25:48 AM »
Hi  nollanhej, how did we ever keep the fluffy BD looking smart, with  really sharp creases in both blouse & trousers? The todays army uniform is of  camouflage design with no trace of creases & looks a right rag bag.
No more hours of pressing & burning your fingers on the hot iron & the metal bits that needed polishing have been replaced with plastic, cap badge is of staybright material, no more Brasso.
Hey Ho, how did we survive?
Ken.

Offline harry

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #28 on: 04 December, 2018, 03:16:15 PM »
Hi Ken, as you probably know during your two years of National Service there were always people who given the chance to (in their own minds) improve the kit supplied by the British Army. One of these was the "fluffy" battle dress. Someone came up with the "brilliant" idea to shave the "fluff" off with a razor  the uniform then taking on the appearance of Gaberdine and then ironing the uniform using brown parcel paper to get a nice sharp crease. The back of the blouse had three creases each side which for a charge of Ten Shillings the tailor would remove the three creases and replace them with one crease each side and voila box pleats on the back.The Brasso tin would have all paint removed leaving just the word Brasso the tin then highly polshed. The boot polish tin treated like wise.The gaitors had the small straps polished , spit and polished, and the small stitches picked out in white blanco !!!.TaLk about Bull Shott!!  At Aldershot the floors were given a good dollop of Mansion Polish and  polished with the dreaded bumper. At Blandford they  went one better , the floors were done over with bath brick and brought up to a nice  dusty white  which meant the floor could not be walked on because the studs in your boots left marks all over the floor no good for billet inspection!!! You don,t have to be mad to serve in the British Army,but it certainly helped.!!! Rgards Harry.I . ps there were no chains for the sink plugs or the toilet chains these were removed to make weights to put in the bottom of your trousers to make the bottom of trousers look neat!!!
« Last Edit: 04 December, 2018, 03:24:42 PM by harry »

Offline nollanhej

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Re: A Dead Horse
« Reply #29 on: 04 December, 2018, 10:30:19 PM »
I also remember having a laughing fit because the Sergeant in charge came and inspected our hut and bed layout. Unfortunately, I saw the funny side of how he was dressed out of uniform. I looked at another recruit, and he started to snigger, which set me off giggling at this normally fierce-looking sergeant, who looked a right clown in his civvies. Unfortunately for me, he saw me trying to stifle my laugh and tipped all my bed display out of the window. He advised the rest of the hut members to "get me" but to be fair he never put me on a charge. Sadly, some of the recruits were going to take him at his word. Fortunately, four rather large lads sided with me and warned the rest of the hut members to lay off. Apparently, you couldn't be put on a charge early on in training. Does anyone remember the umpteen injections you got in both arms in one trip down the medical centre?