Author Topic: The 1939 Register  (Read 1244 times)

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Offline Andy C

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The 1939 Register
« on: 01 March, 2016, 07:57:37 PM »
I have been viewing family address's in the 1939 register. My family all from Tidal Basin are all listed, although some were harder to find than others due to bad transcription errors. For example the name Hastings was transcribed as Hastnip. The register does however record, by overwriting, the married surname of women who married after the record was produced. It does not show any alteration to the home address in the event that their house became unihabitable and they were rehoused.

My question is, has anyone knowledge of any records that were kept that would provide such information, and secondly who would have coordinated the rehousing, did the people just find new homes themselves.

Andy

Offline MickG

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Re: The 1939 Register
« Reply #1 on: 01 March, 2016, 11:06:09 PM »
Andy,

As far as I know the 1939 register was the last definitive register until the end of the war. There are electoral rolls that stopped in 1939 and I believe recommenced in 1945/6, but they only give a persons name and their address. With these you have to deduce relationships by looking at other people living at the same address but only adults aged 21 or older are shown.

Offline Andy C

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Re: The 1939 Register
« Reply #2 on: 02 March, 2016, 11:05:49 AM »
MickG. your correct in saying that this was the last definite register until the end of the war. As you are probably aware the 1931 Census was destroyed by fire, so no official  records of families exist after the previous census in 1921. In 1939 with the war inevitable the government of the time decided to basically bring forward the census they had already planned for 1941. This was used to collate records of the population as to allow for mass mobilisation and to issue National Identification Cards, and once needed Ration Books.
Official procedures prevent information of people born after 1916 being displayed, the 100 year rule, but if it can be verified that the person is deceased the record can be unlocked. Most children are listed but blacked out and some of these, if deceased, can be unlocked.
For those just starting out on family research, these records can be found on Find My Past and are now  included in the membership package.

Andy

Offline Rogier

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Re: The 1939 Register
« Reply #3 on: 02 March, 2016, 01:45:06 PM »
Andy wrote:

"these records can be found on Find My Past and are now  included in the membership package."

Really?
Family historian researching: Allum, Bozier Burrows, French, Goldfinch, Myer Poague, Tyers, Ellis and looking for pictures of Star Street, Scott Street and the early Burke Street

Offline Andy C

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Re: The 1939 Register
« Reply #4 on: 02 March, 2016, 02:36:02 PM »
Full members are allowed full access to these records.