Author Topic: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes  (Read 17416 times)

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Offline JerseyRoadGirl

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Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« on: 28 January, 2015, 03:51:43 PM »
Hi All
As a child of course you took notice of what grow ups told you. Some of these stories, sayings and rhymes may be peculiar to my family, I don't know! I know one story told to me if I was naughty was our own. To make me behave, I was told that mum's younger sister aunty Joany had a little girl who was so naughty, she was tied to a rocket and sent to the moon. I believed this until I was about 10 years old when I started questioning how old was Joany's baby and how old was Joany when she had the baby! Not that I had a clue about such things. They did confess that it was made up but it did the trick!! Funny family but a loving one.

An affectionate name my nan would call me was Polly Nine Hairs. No idea where that was from as my hair was long and normal

Two rhymes my uncles would tell me were:
Not last night but the night before
Two tom moggies came knocking at my door.
I went downstairs to let them
And they knocked me down with a rolling pin.
The rolling pin was made of glass and I fell down and cut my ... FINGER!

The other one was:
Miss Nan Knockabout wouldn't wash her face
And everybody said she was a real disgrace.
Mud, soot and marmalade smeared her cheeks and chin,
Nobody would have guessed she had a pretty soft skin.
One day the chimney sweep knocked at Nancy's door and said
"Pretty maid, you are the one I adore.
Please say that you will marry me for tour face is just like mine.
We could have a family, now wouldn't that be fine?"
Miss Nan Knockabout screamed and ran away and ordered 20 bars of soap the very same day.

These memories came to me recently and I have no-one around from those times to say "Do you remember this?"
Hope I've not burbled on too much but must say that I've enjoyed writing it down. It would be lovely if others have some to share.

Regards
JerseyRoad Girl

Offline jplant1

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #1 on: 12 February, 2015, 01:11:24 AM »
Lovely rhymes. The Nan Knockabout poem is in a few places on the web, with a couple of variations. Nobody seems to know who wrote it. One of the places it appears is in an Enid Blyton magazine, where it is credited to "The Teachers Treasury".
I can't find the "two tom moggies" poem anywhere. Perhaps someone in your family did make it up.

If you remember any more, do post them.

Offline JerseyRoadGirl

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #2 on: 12 February, 2015, 12:41:28 PM »
Hi jplant 1

So nice to hear from you and interesting about Nan Knockabout, will try to find out more.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if Tom Moggies was a family one as being the only grandchild at that time, my plentiful aunts and uncles especially, had great fun teasing me which was lovely because I had no siblings.

They told me that the two little bones in the rasher of bacon were cow's teeth (so young I didn't know bacon came from pigs). Another one that makes smile was that coconuts were monkeys' eggs!

Strangely enough, my boys now grown up, have the same sense of humour. No idea where that came from but it does help to have a sense of the ridiculous when we've gone through tough times.


Offline jplant1

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #3 on: 12 February, 2015, 01:10:34 PM »
Hi JerseyRoadGirl

Have a butchers at
http://www.mamalisa.com/blog/does-anyone-know-a-song-about-a-pancake-tied-to-a-mans-bum-bum-bum/

where there are variations on the three moggies rhyme, none quite like yours. Seems like people have taken it and adapted to suit their own vocabulary all round the world.

Offline Pamela Cross

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #4 on: 12 February, 2015, 05:34:49 PM »
My Mum used to say when she saw a person without much hair, blimey all they've got is 9 hairs and a nit. She was also nicknamed rubber legs for the number of times she fell over.  ;D

Offline emdee

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #5 on: 12 February, 2015, 05:38:04 PM »
I remember the 'Two Tom Cats' rhyme from my childhood in the 1950s. And we sang 'cats' not 'moggies'.

Another rhyme I still say when I see an ambulance is,

Hold your collar
Never 'swaller'
Never catch a fever
Nor you, nor me
Nor all your family
Touch your nose touch your toes
Never go in one of those!

Accompanied by the actions of holding collar, touching nose then toes! I can get some strange looks in the street.

« Last Edit: 15 February, 2015, 05:16:59 PM by emdee »

Offline lyn

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #6 on: 14 February, 2015, 01:57:51 PM »
I knew the Tom Cats one not the other one though.
My mum used to refer to nine hairs and a nit, also Red hat, no drawers.

Offline biff

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #7 on: 14 February, 2015, 07:38:47 PM »
It's probably a local one to West Ham but when we saw someone who had a few gaps in their teeth we used
to say he's  / she's got a mouth like Manor Park Cemetery. (a row of headstones)

Offline JerseyRoadGirl

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #8 on: 14 February, 2015, 09:29:46 PM »
So comical, these old sayings. If someone had gaps in their teeth, my dad would call them railings.

There was no disrespect intended when people were often known by nicknames e.g. Wheezy ..., Hoppy ..., Peg Leg ..., Fitsy ..., if they had a problem of some sort. I sometimes heard the adults say these names but heaven help you as a child if you said it.

Thanks for the interest shown
Jersey Road Girl

Offline lyn

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #9 on: 15 February, 2015, 12:59:33 PM »
If anyone was cheeky/lippy, my mum would say...she has a mouth like Blackwall Tunnel.
My dad was quite dark skinned came from gypsy origins and his nick name was nigger, couldnt call him that now!!!!!

Offline Pamela Cross

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #10 on: 15 February, 2015, 04:20:34 PM »
No names were mentioned on Louise's post, but everyone will know who it was now won't they? So I'll give you a quote "Put that in your pipe and smoke it"

Offline Pamela Cross

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #11 on: 15 February, 2015, 05:06:54 PM »
Brenda, I won't give you the satisfaction of getting into an argument with you on the forum nor by private message. No message from you, has been, or will be, of interest to me. All I will say that is you have done yourself no favours by going public and showing yourself up. I apologise to Admin and the rest of the forum for this spat. Is was not of my making, but I'm sorry for it. No more will be said on my part. Pam

Offline linda c

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #12 on: 16 February, 2015, 04:15:54 PM »
Thank you emdee for the full version of the ambulance rhyme.

We just used to say:-
Hold your collar
Never swallow
Never go in one of those

Other sayings I remember are:-

Tuppence short of a shilling

Keep your hair on

Away with the fairies

Linda

Offline emdee

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #13 on: 16 February, 2015, 06:35:21 PM »
Is Charlie well and truly dead?

When did you last hear ' Charlie's dead!'?


Offline JerseyRoadGirl

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Re: Old Sayings, Stories and Rhymes
« Reply #14 on: 16 February, 2015, 07:32:04 PM »
Hi emdee
I think Charlie could very well be dead. It was my dad's pet hate to see a little petticoat (now that's an old-fashioned word) showing. I think it was it was seen to be "not very nice". How times have changed - he'd have apoplexy if he was around today!

Funny but it did seem to happen quite a bit, don't know why. Probably the elastic that was threaded through in those times, lost its guts due to being washed so often. It was said in such a way to a friend so as not to cause embarrassment  although everyone knew what it meant.

Do you know why "Charlie"?

JRG