Author Topic: East Ham High Street  (Read 76443 times)

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Offline linda c

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East Ham High Street
« on: 10 November, 2011, 04:49:09 PM »
Does anyone remember the name of the draper's shop on the corner of High Street North and the Barking Road. It was opposite the Denmark Pub and sold sheets. towels etc.

The one thing that sticks in my mind was the method of payment in this shop. They didn't have cash registers. When you bought your purchase the written receipt and your money was put in large tube. This tube then travelled along the ceiling to the cash office (this is so hard to explain!). Your change and the receipt was returned in the same way.

Do any other East Hammers remember this shop? And were there other shops in Newham using the same method?

Can you imagine standing in Sainsbury's or other large stores today and waiting for your change in this manner!

Linda


Offline DougT

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #1 on: 10 November, 2011, 05:09:34 PM »
Linda
The shop on the corner of High Street North and Barking Road was Hawkins but being male I never went in there. The idea of sending money to the Cash Office through a Vacuum Tube was also used at the Co-operative Department Store on the corner of the High Street and St. John's Road. It was a common feature in many larger stores in the 1950. I'm sure that the Co-op and Boardmans in Stratford used a similar system but am surprised to learn that Hawkins which was not a large shop alos used this method to deal with sales.

Dougt

Offline linda c

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #2 on: 10 November, 2011, 05:49:30 PM »
Thank you Dougt for your reply and for jogging my memory on the name Hawkins.

I wonder if it was the Co-op where I saw the tubes and my memory is playing tricks!

I have just been looking at earlier postings and on page 12 this method of payment is discussed and as you rightly said Boardmans of Stratford did use this method.

linda

Offline EX CUSTOM HOUSE

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #3 on: 10 November, 2011, 07:12:44 PM »

 Linda,
        I remember both shops well..
 If i had to put money on the answer i would agree it was probably the POSH Co-op
 as all Co-ops seemed to have that money exchange in those days.

 I worked on the opposite corner to which you referred in BOYD PIANOS (any one
 remember them?) iIn 1947 when i was there as Sales Assistant, to a Mr.Clarenbone
 manager we had qeues from 9.0am when i opened (Mr.Clarenbone often very late as
 he travelled in from Sidcup and had dreadful transport troubles) for a Piano as Bill or
 Fred was being discharged from the forces and a family party was the order of the
 day and they had to have a piano to replace the one in the front room that
 had been destroyed in those terrible days of bombing etc.
 
 Mr.C went out every day and bought up as many damaged ones he could find they
 all came back to the the shop and we had three wonderful men that repaired,
 polished, re-tuned and believe me they were great., and i sold them within hours.
 
 We were also Agents for Keith Prowse London Booking Agents for all shows ETC.
 and there were many in those days.  A very busy shop!

 

 lINDA THANKS FOR THE MEMORY OF OVERHEAD COMPUTERS.

  lLouise





   
 


 





Offline GeoffM

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #4 on: 10 November, 2011, 10:23:29 PM »
Linda

Staddons which used to be at the Abbey Arms also used the overhead cash system here is a link to a site which actually shows you what they looked like another little jog for the memory.


.http://www.ids.u-net.com/cash/index.htm


Regards
GeoffM

Offline linda c

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #5 on: 11 November, 2011, 04:09:33 PM »
Thank you Louise for your reply. I just spoke to my mum who is 86 and she said that she does remembers that method of payment in Hawkins Drapers. (She had also forgotten the name of the shop so said to thank Dougt). So it looks as if it must have been a prosperous shop!

With regard to Boyd's piano shop that was where my nan bought their piano (not sure what year). My dad and his brother and sister used to have lessons but I remember dad telling me he used to miss the lesson and go and play football! Somehow he learnt to play and when he played "The little girl that Santa Claus forgot" it used to make me cry!

Thank you also Geoff for your reply and the link which I found very interesting.

Linda

Offline EX CUSTOM HOUSE

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #6 on: 11 November, 2011, 05:02:56 PM »
 
 ;) Linda and Mum,
     Just seen GeoffM photographs, they were great and exactly like you said used
     in Hawkins.  Good old Mum! bet she had a tablecloth or two from them.
     Being as i was 17 it was not a shop i had ever been in, but the Co-op
     to us was a very up-market store (prices far above our East Ham High St.prices.



     Used to lodge with a dear lady in Ruskin Avenue and she had a 16yr old
     Daughter Joan who worked for CWS in make-up dept. (Much to her dads
     distaste of the make up).
     In about 1945/6 she was invited to a Co-op Christmas "do" as were all staff,       
     and they were allowed one guest and that was lucky me!
     Never been able to remember exactly where but it was huge and packed with
     staff of CWS from all over the country.
     What a great party and i have never forgotten the fun and food we had.

      Hope Boyd Piano gave good service

     

      Regards Louise.



.
     

   

Offline linda c

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #7 on: 11 November, 2011, 08:52:32 PM »
Hi Louise

I remember the Co-op in the 60's. I had started work in the Welfare Dept. High St. South (used to be the old Fire Station) and on pay day used to visit the make up counter. Remember buying Max Factor Pan Stick and mascara in a little box. The ladies on the counter were always very helpful.

Another memory I have of the Co-op as a child is the visit to Santa's Grotto with my nan. There was always a ride first (or at least the scenery moved while we sat in a fairy coach) then a chat with Santa who gave you a present.

By the way the piano was still in good condition when nan died in 1981 but as none of the family had the room for it we had to sell it.

Linda

Offline leydaf

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #8 on: 12 November, 2011, 10:49:54 AM »
Linda, you're correct on both counts regarding Santa's Grotto: the top floor of the Co-op was where furniture was displayed and sold; at Christmas time, the furniture was cleared and there would be a pony and trap - Santa's sleigh.  This would pick up the children, and their mums and dads, at one part of the floor, do a couple of circuits then stop at a different part - this was Santa's Grotto, where you would be taken to meet Father Christmas himself - magic!  Later, the pony and trap disappeared and was replaced by a sleigh that was stationary with a motor that moved the scenery to give the impression of movement - you went in one side and came out on the opposite side to meet Father Christmas.  Never the same again! :(  Also, as I got older  Father Christmas seemed to alter - one year he even had glasses!  :o  Know what - I think that he wasn't the REAL Santa, but some guy dressed up in a Father Christmas outfit pretending to be him! ;)

The East Ham Co-op was a superb building with its own clock-tower and was a place where you could buy just about anything: furniture, bedding, curtains, clothes, jewellery, perfumes and make-up, records, music, stationery and supplies for school, shoes, electrical products, toys and, at one time, groceries.  (Groceries were on the ground floor where the escalators were later.)  There was a roof-top garden that had, I believe, a cafe. Sadly, I the roof-top garden was not used when I was a boy, but I did get to see it:  Harry, the old lift man, took my mum and me up there one day as I would ask him where the 'extra' floor shown on his lift panel was! Sadly, we could not stay long as Harry and the lift would have been missed and he would probably have got a rollicking for taking us up there!  Happy days indeed!

My views on the actions of the philistines who saw fit to destroy the East Ham Co-op are not suitable to be be reproduced on these pages .... >:(

All the best to everyone.

David in Suffolk

Offline leydaf

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #9 on: 12 November, 2011, 11:38:16 AM »
Louise, I remember Boyds - 'Boyds of Bond Street' as I recall?  When I was 21, I bought my first hi-fi from them; it was a Ferguson record player with a Garrard SP45 deck and two separate speakers.  I could not afford it in one go, so I bought it on h.p.  I remember my heart pounding as I signed that agreement - what would happen if I lost my job etc, but sign it I did.  I had a little yellow cloth-linen covered book and, each Saturday, I would go over to Boyds and make a payment where a very pleasant middle-aged lady would enter the details into my book, also the shop's ledger.

I loved that stereo and got many hours of enjoyment from it - not sure my dad would have agreed though!

Regards.

David in Suffolk.

Offline ed styles

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #10 on: 12 November, 2011, 01:30:50 PM »
Boyds of Bond St,
                           When I was first married we had a Flat above the Barking branch of Boyds in East st opposite Blakes Market,and had an unusual arrangement to pay our rent. we had to pay it downstairs to the Manager . Later we had a visit from a " heavy " asking about our rent arrears,apparently he forgot to whrite it up and it found it,s way into his pocket. Hmm.
Oh they did have lovely pianos though.
   All the best Ed

Offline EX CUSTOM HOUSE

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #11 on: 12 November, 2011, 03:41:23 PM »
Hello Leydaf,
great to hear from you re Boyd`s.
Sounds a lot different to when i worked there as we then only sold
Pianos and was an agent of Keith Prowse for all West End shows (and there were many in those days) "Me and myGal", Ivor Novello's Perchance to Dream, Flanagan & Alan, to name a few.

When you signed your agreement for the beloved Record Player
did Boyd's still sell Pianos?

A Record Player, a little yellow payment book and a lovely lady to
serve you it must have seemed heaven. (We did appreciate things
more in those days I am sure. Do you agree?         Regards Louise

Offline Will.B

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #12 on: 12 November, 2011, 04:02:55 PM »
The East Ham High St has very many pleasant memories for me, in the 1950s I got my first made to measure suit from a little tailors a couple of doors from East Ham Station and I also I bought my wives engagement and wedding ring from two jewellers in the High Street which was the best few bob I have ever spent.

L.Feitelson Ltd
139/141 High Street,East Ham,E.6
Telephone.GRAngewood 0405

D.Russell (London) Ltd
194 High Street,East Ham E.6
Telephone. GRAangewood 2746

Also I remember the little cafe next door to the Co-op in Barking Road where we sometimes went for a meal,without a doubt the co-op was a grand building,but many years later someone told me that when Newham took it over it cost a small fortune to remove the asbestos from it. whether that's true or not I guess only Newham know.

Offline leydaf

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #13 on: 12 November, 2011, 04:57:35 PM »
Louise, you've got me thinking now.  I seem to recall that there were pianos in the shop, although most of the goods on sale were radiograms, televisions, tape recorders etc and, of course, record players.  The reason I think there were pianos was because while I was in the shop one day, a chap came in and tried one out;  I remarked to one of the staff that the chap was quite a good player and her response was that they had had another chap in previously who had mesmerised them with his virtuosity!  (Just hoping that this isn't a 'false memory!')

I think that it was quite difficult to sell pianos in the 60s and 70s - many were smashed up by people who did not want them and couldn't find anyone to take them off their hands.  I even recall 'Piano Smashing Contests.'

Regarding the Co-op, there was also a Co-op chemists, a Co-op butchers, a Co-op greengrocers, a Co-op funeral service and, wouldn't be entertained these days, a Co-op tobacconists.  I've been wracking my brains, but I don't recall a Co-op bakers; maybe someone else will be able to throw light upon this?

Best regards.
David
« Last Edit: 12 November, 2011, 05:02:28 PM by leydaf »

Offline DH

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Re: East Ham High Street
« Reply #14 on: 12 November, 2011, 05:11:12 PM »
Re the Co-op at East Ham, I remember they had their own hairdressing department, I think on the second floor?  It must have been around mid 1950s, I used to have to go there with my Mum when she had her hair permed, very boring for a young child!  The hair dressing department was very posh with individual cubicles, each cubicle allocated their own hairdresser, sink, hair dryer, with curtains that could be pulled across to give privacy.  Also, the overhead cash system was used at Young & Martens at Stratford, the chugging backwards and forwards fascinating.  Dee