Author Topic: southend  (Read 3059 times)

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Offline nan

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southend
« on: 21 July, 2008, 01:14:17 PM »
i was born in 1927 and my dad was in the building trade,always in and out of work,so
our holiday was a day in barking park or a day at greenwich park,rolling down the hills !!!i first saw the seaside when i was 11 yrs of age,my brother and i went to the sunday school outing to southend,i couldnt believe there was so much water,as soon as we got there my brother fell over and hurt his knee badly,so i had to sit with him all day in the st john ambulance hut,so my trip to southend was not  all that after all,then got told off by mum for not looking after him (on the beach)
but i have made up for it since,there are some beautiful places in the british isles
if only we had the weather to go with it.

Offline jackie corrie

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Re: southend
« Reply #1 on: 08 August, 2008, 12:15:44 PM »
hi nan our holiday was a day at southend we would get the coach from the greengate the company was called laceys, the coach always stopped at tahe halfway house, that one day would stay with you for a long time.
jackie

Offline Pauline Cooper

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Re: southend
« Reply #2 on: 12 August, 2008, 12:08:29 AM »
Loved going to Southend.  Many members of our Freeman family left London during the war to live in Southend and never came back to Custom House.  Our grandfather lived in the street behind the Kursal so we all enjoyed visting him as we knew we would be able to have some time there especially on the Big Dipper.   Never came back from there without some Southend rock.  Of course the famous pier (before it burnt down) was always an attraction to walk the whole length of it and then ride the little rail train back.   Just walking down from the station to the seafront was an exciting time just waiting to see the beach and the sea.  What about the fun hats people walking around wearing with the words "Kiss Me Quick" written on one of them. 

We still have relatives living in Southend so on trips back to the UK we have another good excuse to visit Southend and enjoy just being there once again.

Pauline 

Offline Mike Baines

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Re: southend
« Reply #3 on: 26 October, 2008, 11:54:48 AM »
On the walk down from the station, the line from Barking, we would stop at Rossi's, just along for the station, for a cornet and get another one at another Rossi's on the seafront.

I loved the racing cars on the track near Peter Pan's Playground by the pier.  Three laps for what, a bob?  Great stuff and as you said a walk along the pier followed by a ride back.  Simple pleasures, wonderful memories.
Gercha!

Offline Stan Dyson

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Re: southend
« Reply #4 on: 26 October, 2008, 09:06:25 PM »
As a kid in the early 1950’s I always thoroughly enjoyed our family days out at Southend-on Sea.  For me the holiday started when our 669 trolley bus stopped at Plaistow Railway Station.  The thrill of just standing as close as possible to the edge of the platform as the steam train chugged in and I was enveloped in the steam, with that unforgettable warm damp stench.  I always enjoyed hanging out of the window, with dad always shouting, ‘Careful, you’ll get some cinders in your eyes.’  Funny, he was always right!
Invariably, we plotted up right next to the open air swimming baths and I would pop in for a dip and a dive off the boards.  It was always freezing in there, and of course salt water that made your eyes sore.  I always went into the Thames Estuary water afterwards just to warm up a bit.  We always ended up in a corner tea house called (from memory) Cottis or Cotters and had fish & chips.  Then before getting the steam train home it was a quick go in Peter Pans Playground.  The Crooked House was always my favourite & I was fascinated by our visit to The Golden Hind and after walking down the gangplank at the end of the trip, I thoroughly enjoyed walking along that long narrow corridor that featured the moving exhibits of ‘Torture Through The Ages.’  For a 50’s kid, a pure magic day out!   

Offline Barry

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Re: southend
« Reply #5 on: 27 October, 2008, 08:08:40 AM »
We joined the train at Upton Park. Was it all stations or East Ham, Barking then Upminster etc.
Treat everyday of your life as your last.
One day you will be right.

Why do New Age Travellers have old caravans and Old Age Travellers new ones?

Offline Jenny Freeman

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Re: southend
« Reply #6 on: 27 October, 2008, 08:21:40 AM »
I loved that 'fairy' garden walk thru the gardens all lite up at night with mum and dad at southend.

My granddad moved there, and lived behind the kursal(sp), so we often had a day out to see him.

I always wanted one of those 'knickerbocker glories' they cost 1 pound and a huge outlay at the time............however, I did have one once and couldnt finish it.........

Offline Jenny Freeman

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Re: southend
« Reply #7 on: 27 October, 2008, 08:26:44 AM »
Oh I just remembered the 'crazy house' too which was built all lopsided......I remember it being such an interesting feature........most likely it was called the House that Jack built being as I am having such a hard time with the correct names at the moment. !!! lol

Offline Mike Baines

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Re: southend
« Reply #8 on: 27 October, 2008, 09:45:08 AM »
Perhaps my memory is going but I recall we took the tube from Plaistow to Barking which was (I understood)( the first stop after Fenchurch Street.

We would be dragged out of our beds at some ungodly hour if the weather was fine so that my father could buy 'Workman's' tickets to save some money on the fares.
Gercha!