Author Topic: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs  (Read 2027 times)

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Offline DebbieH

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Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« on: 12 October, 2008, 06:09:30 PM »
 Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs by Maurice Goymer.

 A story Through the eyes of a 10 yr old growing up during WWII in East Ham.

Offline Peter Marshall

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #1 on: 25 October, 2008, 06:13:33 PM »
Debbie
I have not come across this book.  Is it one you would recommend? 
Peter
Researching: Marshall [28 Carson Rd, 285 Grange Rd and 46 Kildare Rd], Rickard [34 Godbold Rd where I was born] as well as Blackery and Tresadern families who moved into the area.

Offline DebbieH

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #2 on: 10 November, 2008, 10:38:43 PM »
Hi Peter
I really enjoyed it.

Offline linda c

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #3 on: 28 August, 2012, 10:08:46 AM »
Have just finished reading this very interesting book about the author's memories of the Second World War. Mr Goymer was aged 10 and living in Montpelier Gardens, East Ham when war broke out. There are various photo's showing Central Park School, Montpelier Gardens, Hallsville Road School Custom House, The Silvertown Explosion and the bomb damage to St Barts Church East Ham.

This book covers the bombing of the East End, evacuation, school and family life and detailed information about the naval ships and the R.A.F.

Something that I didn't know is that during the war the employees of the Ford Motor Co. in Dagenham were given the opportunity for their children to be evacuated to the United States or Canada. This was sponsored by the parent Ford Motor Co in North America. I imagine that this scheme probably would have included children from East/West Ham if their fathers were employed by Fords.

Well worth a read. I purchased my copy from Amazon price £5.39.

Linda

Offline dave twitchett

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #4 on: 08 September, 2017, 04:19:48 PM »
Just read this at last. Those others who have read it will recall the graphic account of the night Geoffrey Gardens got hit. I can confirm the accuracy for I was there- bombed out of no 35.  Father was out on ARP  or Firewatching. Stepmother and me were excavated from the Anderson shelter and then attention turned to excavating Grandfather from under the dining room table: thus I was forgotten.  Suddenly remembered! Where's David!! They soon found me of course standing on top of. the Anderson shelter wearing my toy tin helmet  and  shooting at the sky with my toy Tommy gun which worked on the football rattle system. That was my contribution to the war effort!!! I had just turned five.

Offline ed styles

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #5 on: 08 September, 2017, 11:10:06 PM »
Dave, can just imagine it , straight out of a Giles cartoon .
  Ed

Offline linda co

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #6 on: 09 September, 2017, 07:51:15 AM »
I agree Ed. What a wonderful story Dave. I bet your stepmother had forty fits when she saw you!

Linda

Offline dave twitchett

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #7 on: 10 September, 2017, 11:44:32 AM »
Mr Goymer does not mention the aftermath of the Geoffrey Gardens bombs so maybe I can expand the subject a bit.  I recall living in the Town Hall or one of the adjacent halls with the salvaged furniture stacked around us in our designated space. At first always somebody present to guard the belongings so meals were taken in shifts at Cassetaris or the other cafe adjacent to The Working Mens' Club in  the Barking Road ( Central Cafe??)  It was almost opposite The Central if memory serves. How long this went on for I cannot recall but eventually a very old slum cottage in Brentwood was rented, delightfully situated in Hart St. between The Gardener's Ams and a slaughterhouse. ( Behind the High Street and running parallel thereto)   How long we stayed there I cannot recall but after some difficult steam train commuting to the city for father  they evidently gave up and moved back to East Ham. WE were at Brentwood long enough for me to start school and be terrified of the nuns in their black habits and nasty habits of being fierce to young David  for various inadvertent misdemeanours, like swinging on the iron gate. Many of the houses in East Ham were empty and requisitioned so there was a choice but number twelve Montpelier Gardens was chosen- at the other end of the street from Mr Goymer and Geoffrey Gardens. I recall, as did Mr Goymer, the big rolltop bath in the kitchen with its zinc covered wooden top. Everything stored atop this bath had to be removed on bath night and later put back again. Curiously the bath was not plumbed in although fortunately  it was plumbed out. Water was heated in a copper and transferred by the bucketload!! Father remained there for something like sixty years until he eventually went on ahead.

Offline Kwasind

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Re: Bombs, Stinging Nettles and Doodlebugs
« Reply #8 on: 17 October, 2017, 02:50:56 PM »
Hi All. Have just finished reading B.SN.&D having seen Dave Twitchet's and previous posts re. this great nostalgic story especially as I also lived in Montpelier Gdns (68) at that time and also new Dave! Oh boy did the memories start flooding back. Especially regarding Central Park and the childrens play area where the "Jazz" was located as I met my future wife on the Jazz, she was 11 years old I was 12 and we're still together having been married 62 years! She lived in St. Bernards rd just across the Barking rd from Kimberely Ave. Her family were bombed out in 1940-41? (before I knew her of course) and parents were injured but survived as did the 4 children (her sister and 2 brothers) My family were lucky as we all survived unscathed even though we "stayed put." I don't remember Maurice Goymer, he was 5years older than me but I did know Jack Dupuy who is mentioned in his very informative book.  Another family connection, to a photo in the book, of the Silvertown explosion of 1917 was my grandfather on my mothers side was a fireman in the East Ham fire service and was at the aftermath of that event and was awarded medal for bravery (as,  I believe, most of the services who attended did). It was documented at the time that the explosion was heard as far away as Sandrinham in Norfolk and Brighton on the south coast and the fire was visible as far as Maidstone in Kent! Some bang!!!